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My Classroom is my Business

Sometimes I feel like I am still a first-year teacher.  I still love teaching as much as I did the first year.  In fact, I love it more!  I am still searching for new ideas and lessons, I still get excited and nervous when trying something new, and I am still looking for ways to grow and learn.  The one thing that has changed is that I am not afraid to take risks. In fact, I relish any opportunity to do so!  I can often be heard saying the following in my classroom:

"I have something I want to try today, and I'm soooo excited about it.  It might go really well or really bad!  Let's hope it goes well."

"Hey kids! I found this really neat extension I want to show you today.  Let me show you how to install and use it.  Then you can play around with it!"

"I've never done this before, so you kids are going to try it out for me and let me know what you think?"

"So, I'd like you to reflect on my lesson today and tell me what you thought."

Th…
Recent posts

Another First Week in the Books

Whew!  I'm beat!  I feel like I just ran a marathon with a refrigerator tied around my waist.  Any teacher will tell you that the first few weeks are exhausting.  We don't know students' names, they don't know procedures , and let's face it, it's not easy getting up at 5:30!  Yet, I am thrilled with my first week.  I was able to implement so many things that I learned over the summer!  I read countless posts by Catlin Tucker, Jen Roberts, and Alice Keeler who I now consider my Twitter mentors!  I also read Teach Like a Pirate by Dave Burgess and Ditch that Homework by Alice Keeler.  All of this reading reignited my passion and excitement for teaching and provided me with countless tools and strategies to make this my best year yet!

Rather than bore the kids to death by going over my syllabus the first day, we embarked on the spaghetti/marshmallow tower challenge.  Students competed to build the tallest structure using twenty pieces of spaghetti (uncooked), a yar…

I Agree: Ditch that Homework

I have been on both ends of the homework equation, teacher and parent. As a teacher, I have assigned it countless times, but it never felt right. Most of the time I felt guilty for assigning it but felt I had to.  I mean, kids spend six hours a day in school. Shouldn't we be able to get our job done in that amount of time?  Shouldn't kids get to go home and spend time with their families, play sports, go to youth group,  play outside, surf, and relax? As a teacher, I've been irritated and frustrated when students did not complete it. I've heard some of the following:


I lost itI was sick last nightI fell asleepI forgot how to do itI had soccer practice until 9My grandma is in the hospitalI had too much math homeworkMy maid threw it awayI forgot itOur internet was downMy dog ate it (the student handed me paper with tooth marks)Unfortunately, sometimes my lesson for that day was dependent on students completing their homework. If they didn't have it, they couldn't …

What Do Teachers Do in the Summer?

Based on the memes I have seen over the past few months, most people seem to think that teachers spend their summers drinking wine like water and watching Netflix in their pajamas all day.  What do I love about summer?  Sleeping in past 5:30, working out when I want to, peeing when I want to, not needing a nap, staying up past 10, and catching up with friends.  I am not going to lie; it's been great!  However, I have spent several hours each day reading books about teaching writing, working on my website and blog, reading countless educational articles on Twitter, lesson planning for a new class I am teaching,  and learning new ways to incorporate technology in my classroom in meaningful ways. 
I use my summer to reflect on the past year and to set new goals for the upcoming year.  Here are my goals so far: 1) To make my classroom one that kids love to walk into. To connect with my students and get them fired up about learning.
2) To spend more time giving feedback WHILE students are…

How I Wrapped up the Year with Learning Maps

A few weeks ago I read an article about having students create an end of the year learning map.  I liked the idea of having students reflect on all that they'd learned but was a little irked that there were no pictures or clear instructions.  Fortunately, I had a picture in my mind and promised myself I'd publish my own pictures when my students finished.

I cut three large pieces of butcher paper and wrote the following in the middle:  writing, reading, and listening/speaking.  In the meantime, I gave students about forty minutes to review all of their work published to our class blog, all of the comments they received from me on turnitin, their English notebooks, and the grade book.  I told them to jot down notes about what they specifically learned this year as they reflected on their work.

Then, I placed the posters around the room and asked students to visit each one, writing down what they learned this year.  I told them to consider writing down the activity and what they l…

Moments that Matter

Of course, I love teaching The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and showing my students why Twain is a genius.  Of course, I love reading a spectacular student essay that we worked on for weeks.  Of course, I love listening to students have thoughtful, insightful discussions about things that matter.  Yet, what I love about teaching are the connections I make with students.  The moments that fill my heart with joy both when they are happening and sometimes years later.
Wednesday my students were working on creating a playlist for The Pearl.  They had to come up with a song that represented each chapter and write an explanation to support their choice.  It was the perfect assignment for the end of the year.  The kids could socialize and listen to music while working on the assignment.  The room was filled with happy chatter.  As I walked around checking in with and talking with students, I noticed one of my students sitting alone.  She was working on her project, but something seemed a little o…

Celebrating Ice and Ice Cream in Read 180

I supplement the Read 180 program with many of my own lessons and activities.  Two key components of my class are Newsela (which I've blogged about already) and Scholastic Action magazine.


 My students look forward to getting our monthly magazine and enjoy having a tangible copy to hold in their hands.  It's filled with high-interest, age-appropriate articles. Students also appreciate the colorful pictures, graphs, and charts.  Although the magazines could easily stand on their own, I often like to develop my own lessons to complement them.


This month's magazine features an article called ICY HISTORY and is followed by another called ICE CREAM FOR ALL.  I immediately knew I had a great excuse to bring in ice cream for my kiddos! Any excuse for ice cream!


I began my pre-teaching a few key words from the article.  I use  Kate Kinsella's  method for teaching vocabulary.  We then read the article using the cloze reading strategy--one of my favorites. The teacher reads the ar…